Case Studies: SOS© Consultations

Case One

CLIENT: A Telecommunications Company

The Challenge:
A family relocating from Ontario to British Columbia questioned whether or not they should enrol their two children into a local Public or a Catholic school.

The Solution:
EC conducted research on the differences between the local schools and provided the family with opinion on their schooling options. The family was surprised to learn that if they wanted their children to have a Catholic education in British Columbia, then they would have to send their children to a private Catholic school and pay tuition fees. Unlike in Ontario, Catholic education is not subsidized by the provincial government in British Columbia.

The Outcome:
Using the information provided by EC, the family decided to place their children into the local Public School as private school tuition was not included in their relocation package.


Case Two

CLIENT: A Computer Firm

The Challenge:
A family relocating from New York to Texas needed information about schooling options for their 4 year old son and 8 eight year old daughter in order to plan their school search for the following year.

The Solution:
EC reviewed their daughter’s report cards and researched schools for both of the children. The local public school in the target area was well suited to their daughter’s needs. However, due to their son’s birth date, he was not eligible to enter Kindergarten in Texas. The family was concerned because if the family remained in New York, their son would be eligible to enter Kindergarten.

The Outcome:
The family was quite concerned about their son falling behind his peers. EC then suggested a number of alternative solutions and the family decided to enrol both of their children into a private school that allowed a flexible enrolment cut off birth date for Kindergarten.


Case Three

CLIENT: An Insurance Company

The Challenge:
A family relocating from the United States to Canada with a teenage son asked whether admissions procedures for specific universities differed between these two countries.

The Solution:
EC researched the admissions process of the prospective universities and informed the family that their son had to write five of the SAT tests (i.e., Verbal, Quantitative and three specialized tests). That is, for students graduating from an American school, the SAT is an entrance requirement at most Canadian universities.

The Outcome:
The family had thought that because the student was originally Canadian that he would not have to write the SAT. They enrolled their son in a SAT preparation course in ample time prior to the admissions process.

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